Recently, the Federal Circuit held that Administrative Patent Judges (“APJs”) comprising the 3-member USPTO Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”) are unconstitutionally appointed in violation of the Appointments Clause of the Constitution. The court promptly remedied the violation and limited its effect on other PTAB decisions.

Continue Reading The Federal Circuit’s Determination That Administrative Patent Judges are Unconstitutionally Appointed

On October 1, 2019, in Honeywell Int’l Inc. v. Arkema Inc., Appeals 2018-1151, -1153 (Fed. Cir. Oct. 1, 2019), the Federal Circuit held that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“the Board”) abused its discretion by requiring Honeywell Int’l Inc. (“Honeywell”) to show that the requirements of 35 U.S.C. § 255 were met before

On October 22, 2019, the USPTO published a Federal Register notice proposing changes to the rules of practice for inter partes review (“IPR”), post-grant review (“PGR”), and covered business method patents (“CBM”) (collectively “post-grant trial”) proceedings regarding burdens of persuasion for motions to amend and the patentability of substitute claims.[1]

Specifically, the Federal Register

A recent Federal Circuit opinion held that state sovereignty does not shield states from  inter partes review (“IPR”) before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (the “Board”). Regents of the Univ. of Minn. V. LSI Corp., No. 2018-1559 (Fed. Cir. June 14, 2019) (opinion available here). This decision is another strike against sovereign

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) published the Office Patent Trial Practice Guide (“Practice Guide”) in 2012 to apprise the public of standard practices before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB” or “Board”) during AIA trial proceedings and to encourage consistency of procedures among panels of the Board. In order to keep

Article III standing has become a contested and often dispositive issue in appeals from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB).  For example, as we reported previously, the Federal Circuit has dismissed an inter partes review (IPR) petitioner’s appeal where the petitioner-appellant lost standing by abandoning development of its potentially infringing product.[1]  We also

Recently, in AVX Corp. v. Presidio Components, Inc., the Federal Circuit dismissed AVX Corp.’s (“AVX”) appeal of the PTAB’s inter partes review decision for lack of standing. AVX petitioned the PTAB for an inter partes review of the 21 claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,661,639 (“the ’639 patent”). Presidio Components Inc. (“Presidio”) owns the

An upcoming Precedential Opinion Panel (“POP”) at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB” or “the Board”) may offer improved clarity for petitioners and patent owners when a petitioner relies on non-patent literature in challenging a patent.

Background

Hulu, LLC sought inter partes review (“IPR”) of U.S. Patent No. 5,806,062 (“the ’062 patent”) asserting claims

Faced with criticism from legislators and patent owners for perceived serial harassment by patent challengers, on May 7, 2019, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“the PTAB” or “the Board”) designated two decisions as “precedential” that arguably expand its discretion to deny petitions in PTAB proceedings.

Previously, in General Plastic Industrial Co., Ltd. v. Canon

On April 18, 2019, in Dodocase VR, Inc. v. MerchSource, LLC, No. 2018-1724 (Fed. Cir. Apr. 18, 2019) (nonprecedential), the Federal Circuit affirmed the District Court for the Northern District of California, agreeing that Dodocase VR, Inc. (“Dodocase”) is entitled to a preliminary injunction against MerchSource, LLC (“MerchSource”). The preliminary injunction requires that MerchSource