Last week, four major technology companies – Apple, Cisco, Google, and Intel – brought suit against the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”), challenging its authority to reject petitions for inter partes review (“IPR”) based on two precedential decisions by its Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”).  The decisions, Apple Inc. v. Fintiv, Inc.

The Supreme Court of the United States issued a ruling today in Return Mail, Inc. v. Postal Service, 587 U.S. ___ (2019), holding that the United States Government is not a “person” eligible to petition for covered-business-method (“CBM”) review, inter partes review (“IPR”), or post-grant review (“PGR”) America Invents Act (“AIA”) proceedings before the

On January 24, 2019, the PTAB denied institution of inter partes review (“IPR”) in Deeper, UAB v. Vexilar, Inc., Case IPR2018-01310 (PTAB Jan. 24, 2019) (Paper 7). The PTAB exercised its discretion to deny institution despite finding that Deeper demonstrated a reasonable likelihood of success in prevailing as to two of the twenty-three claims

The PTAB will soon implement a change in its claim construction standard in post-issuance reviews, moving from the broadest reasonable interpretation (“BRI”) standard to the standard articulated in the Federal Circuit’s opinion, Phillips v. AWH Corp.[1]  We previously covered this on our blog here. The effects of the change may be significant in

The Supreme Court held in SAS Institute Inc. v. Iancu, 138 S. Ct. 1348 (2018), that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s (“PTAB” or “the Board”) practice of so-called partial institutions was contrary to the statute.  The Supreme Court explained that once an inter partes review (“IPR”) is instituted, the PTAB must decide on

Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued two important decisions relating to inter partes review (IPR) proceedings before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO).

Oil States Energy Services, LLC v. Greene’s Energy Group, LLC, U.S., No. 16-712, 4/24/2018

In Oil States, the Supreme Court ruled