The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) announced that it considers the effects of COVID-19 (“the Coronavirus”) to be an “extraordinary situation.” Under 37 CFR 1.183, in extraordinary situations, the Director may suspend or waive any requirement of the regulations which is not a statutory requirement. Accordingly, as of the time of this writing,

In BioDelivery Sciences International v. Aquestive Therapeutics, Inc., the Federal Circuit recently denied a petition for a rehearing en banc after the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB” or “the Board”) interpreted its remand order to “implement the [Supreme] Court’s decision in [SAS Institute v. Iancu]”[1] by modifying its institution decision, denying

On December 11, 2019, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”) designated Ex parte Hannun, 2018-003323 (Apr. 1, 2019) as an informative PTAB decision for applying the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s (“USPTO”) 2019 Revised Patent Subject Matter Eligibility Guidance (“2019 PEG”) to determine patent eligibility under 35 U.S.C. § 101.

As laid

Following on the heels of the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s request for comments, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) recently released an issues paper on artificial intelligence (AI) and intellectual property (IP) policy.  Comments may be submitted by February 14, 2020.

Continue Reading World Intellectual Property Organization Weighs in on Artificial Intelligence and Intellectual Property

On October 4, 2019, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) published a notice of proposed rulemaking to revise the rules of prosecution practice pertaining to patent term adjustment (“PTA”) in view of the decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit) in Supernus Pharm., Inc. v. Iancu,

On October 22, 2019, the USPTO published a Federal Register notice proposing changes to the rules of practice for inter partes review (“IPR”), post-grant review (“PGR”), and covered business method patents (“CBM”) (collectively “post-grant trial”) proceedings regarding burdens of persuasion for motions to amend and the patentability of substitute claims.[1]

Specifically, the Federal Register

On August 22, 2019, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) published a request for comments on patenting artificial intelligence inventions.  In addition to seeking general feedback from the public, the USPTO posed the following questions for comment:

  1. What are elements of an AI invention;
  2. How can a natural person contribute to conception

Recently, the U.S Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit held that the retroactive application of inter partes review (“IPR”) proceedings to pre-AIA issued patents is not a violation of the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment.  In Celgene Corp. v. Peter, Celgene appealed the Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s (“PTAB”) final written decision